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Category Archives: Study

What have I done!?

Thesis struggles

Being a student is awesome, if you leave high school and move away from your parents you gain a lot of freedom and you do whatever you like. But of course you are going to a different stage in your life that also contains new responsibilities.
J-1Exchange

The exchange experience

At Tilburg University the fall semester is marked by students going abroad and spending a full semester within their degree at a university somewhere around the globe. The information for this article did not have to come from far, since within Asset|Economics there are many students coming back from exchange at the beginning of the spring semester. By now the spring semester has already started and we are looking back with Rutger Smids and Leon Bremer on their exchange experience. Both Rutger and Leon are now in their third year of their Bachelor Economics and Business Economics at Tilburg University and they are active members at Asset | Economics.

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From Tilburg to Cambridge: interview with Maarten de Ridder

Last year, student Maarten de Ridder (22) graduated in MSc Economics at Tilburg University, scoring a 10 out of 10 with his thesis on wage rigidity and business cycle dynamics in the United States. After winning a scholarship, he continued his studies in Cambridge. We asked him some questions about his experience so far, and what he learned from his time in Tilburg. “My time at Tilburg University gave a solid background for Cambridge.”

Sander Coenraad

The person behind two master degrees within 24 hours

Sander Coenraad, who has a Master degree in both Economics and Econometrics, tells us about his fruitful student life. After over 6 years of studying Sander Coenraad was able to obtain two masters within 24 hours last October. As this is a very outstanding performance I was wondering how Sander spent his 6 years at Tilburg University and how he got to obtaining two master degrees.

Graph With Stacks Of Coins

‘Studying economics makes you happier’

In recent years, literature on the so-called economics of happiness, which examines the (economic) factors that affect individual happiness, has grown rapidly. It is said that its findings have been a serious challenge to the economic profession. But what about the happiness of economists themselves? Two German economists have now estimated the causal effect of studying economics on subjective well-being.