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Author Archives: Albert Rutten

Albert Rutten

Albert Rutten is currently a first year research master student at Tilburg University. He is particularly interested in the fields of banking supervision, labor economics, and macroeconomics.

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Pension Headache and the Missing Part of the Puzzle

The first Rutte cabinet (Rutte I) decided to increase the retirement age in 2011. At that time, the Dutch parliament agreed upon an increase of the retirement age to 66 in 2020. After the fall of this cabinet, the second Rutte cabinet (Rutte II) proposed a more rigorous solution in the retirement age question. The retirement age should increase to 66 in 2018 and in steps to 67 in 2021. From 2022 onwards it will be linked to the life expectancy. That is why as of this year the retirement age to receive the (full) AOW-benefit increased to 66[1].

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The Revival of Dutch Wage Growth

The last couple of years, a number of institutions spoke out on the low wage level in the Netherlands. The Dutch Central bank already indicated a number of times that companies have room to increase wages. This claim is confirmed by the Central Planning Bureau. Even the IMF points out that labor wages are relatively low in the Netherlands.

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“This time is different” – how bail-ins should relieve taxpayers’ money

During the Financial Crisis of 2008 taxpayers’ money was frequently used to save banks from bankruptcy. In the Netherlands ABN-AMRO and SNS Reaal were bailed out by the government for the staggering amounts of 22 billion and 3.7 billion euro respectively. Moreover, the Irish government came into severe trouble after saving their financial infrastructure from the abyss. These rescues caused governments to take the full blow, resulting in a “free lunch” for banks’ shareholders and bondholders. As a result, taxpayers (and politicians too) were disappointed in and angry with those “irresponsible bankers”.

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Will the commercialization of football ever reach its limit?

Last transfer window will most of all be remembered by the transfer of Neymar from FC Barcelona to Paris Saint-Germain (PSG) for the astonishing amount of 222 million euro. Moreover, PSG paid 180 million euro for Kylian Mbappé. Both transfers pulverized the previous record transfers of Paul Pogba, Cristiano Ronaldo, and Gareth Bale, which all were transferred for a fee of approximately one hundred million euro.